9 comments

  1. i love this, trainer! the painting and your viewpoint of the prodigal son story. it doesn’t take religion to understand this story and your writing is such a strong testament to that- SO COOL! so truthful. love is counter-cultural, forgiveness is counter-cultural. but being counter-cultural is a beautiful thing. keep it up, dudeee.

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  2. Such a moving post Michael, just wonderful. What an amazing idea you had, getting your students to play out each of those roles – that just blew me away. The story of the prodigal son always brings to my mind the last section of Rilke’s ‘The Notebook of Malte Laurids Brigge’, which I love. Of course Rilke brings his own interpretation to that encounter, but then I suppose we all do, and will, as we mature and assume those different roles. Powerful stuff! Thank you.

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  3. A classic. I’m surprised, especially considering the number of times it’s been painted I didn’t know the story.

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  4. What a rich post. Oh, I would love your input on the recent Finale to my series on the writing process “Calling All Artists, Writers, Thinkers.” My friend grew up in Blue B. I taught in Philly, then Cheltenham, so was around those parts plenty.

    Way back.

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